How to Dye and Stencil Curtains Using Chalk Paint by Annie Sloan

How to Dye and Stencil Curtains Using Chalk Paint by Annie Sloan

Photography by Christopher Drake and Annie Sloan.

These curtains are made out of our Pure Linen fabric then dyed and stencilled using Chalk Paint by Annie Sloan. Annie used a single curtain tape to make it hang in a casual, loose way. It hangs in front of a wall painted in Graphite and the chair in front is painted in Old White.


HomeInterior_728x90

Annie ran a bath with a small amount of water in it – about 40 litres, just enough to make certain the fabric is well covered. She then poured in about a third of a litre of Chalk Paint. She used Château Grey, mixing into the water with her hand.

Photography by Christopher Drake and Annie Sloan.

She dipped the curtain in the bath.

Photography by Christopher Drake and Annie Sloan.

She swished the fabric around making sure that each bit has been done and there’s no fabric that is scrunched up. You only need to have the fabric in there for a short period – 2-3 minutes is usually enough. She then allowed the fabric to drip dry outdoors (on a cold or rainy day, you can do this indoors next to a radiator).

Photography by Christopher Drake and Annie Sloan.

She laid her curtain out and then started to create the stripes down the curtain using masking tape. On this curtain, she made the stripes 13cm wide with a gap of 20cm between them. She laid her masking tape down and made certain that it was stuck firmly to the fabric.

Photography by Christopher Drake and Annie Sloan.

She then used Château Grey diluted with a very small amount of water and applied the paint with a small Flat Brush. She painted the fabric using a dry brush and a small amount of paint at a time. She started in the centre of the stripe and when the brush had less paint on it, worked from the tape to the fabric to help keep the line crisp.

Photography by Christopher Drake and Annie Sloan.

Once the paint was dry, she removed the tape.

Photography by Christopher Drake and Annie Sloan.

She then applied her Branches stencil in Old Violet along the edge of the Château Grey stripes. She did this without measuring, making certain the ends of the Branches pattern touched the stripe in the same place each time.

Photography by Christopher Drake and Annie Sloan.

 

Photography by Christopher Drake and Annie Sloan.

For Australia and NZ, look for your nearest stockist of Chalk Paint™ by Annie Sloan here. Other countries click here, to search for your nearest stockist. Look out for more advanced furniture painting projects on Havven soon. Further inspiration for all levels of painting projects can be found on the Annie Sloan website, also the Annie Sloan step-by-step tutorial series via YouTube.

Want more like this?

Get new projects delivered to your inbox!

Annie Sloan Sign Off

 

9 Comments
    1. Hi Karen, Good question. Can the polyester fabric be dyed in the first place? One big advantage of polyester over natural fibers is its ability to resist stains. However, this advantage has its downside: polyester does not take kindly to dyeing. For polyester to absorb dye, it needs extremely high heat and even then, the effort is not always successful. I would say no.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

havven icon
Havven is a creative resource for those that share a similar passion for the art of making.

FOLLOW US ON